Seminar Joana Pereira

Tweet SEMINAR UNF SERIES Speaker:  Joana Pereira, Ph. D. Title: Alterations of the brain connectome as an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease Where: CRIUGM Room E1910 (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) When: Wednesday August 21st,  11h00-12h00 *The seminar will be presented in English Dr. Pereira is an associate professor at the Division of Clinical Geriatrics. She has a PhD in Biomedicine by the University of Barcelona. Dr Pereira is working with structural MRI, functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Her current projects are focused on the assessment of brain connectivity and network topology in preclinical and clinical stages of these disorders.   Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurological disorder with a long preclinical phase that typically extends over two decades. As AD progresses, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles spread in the brain according to a characteristic spatial pattern. Since this spread along connected brain regions is associated with the development of cognitive decline and dementia, alterations of brain connectivity can identify individuals with early AD and predict their progression. The entire network of connections between brain regions is known as the brain connectome. In this talk, I will present evidence that changes in the brain connectome can be used to identify individuals at high risk of developing AD and I will also compare them with connectome changes in another prevalent neurodegenerative disorder – Parkinson’s...

Seminar Clare Kelly

Tweet SEMINAR UNF SERIES Speaker:  Clare Kelly, Ph. D. Title: Progress and promise of fMRI functional connectomics for neuropsychiatric disorders Where: CRIUGM Amphitheatre Le Groupe Maurice (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) When: Wednesday August 14th,  13h00-14h00 *The seminar will be presented in English Dr. Clare Kelly graduated from Trinity with her BA in 2002 and PhD in 2006 (Psychology). She spent the next nine years at New York University School of Medicine, where she made key contributions to the field of functional connectomics, a network-based technique that examines patterns of synchronised brain activity to provide a comprehensive, non-invasive map of brain circuitry. Her work includes seminal demonstrations of the clinical, developmental, and translational utility of functional connectomics for our understanding of healthy and disordered brain function. In January 2015, Clare returned to Trinity College to become an Ussher Assistant Professor of Functional Neuroimaging, working at Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience (TCIN), the School of Psychology, and Department of Psychiatry at the School of Medicine. At TCD, Clare uses translational brain imaging techniques to examine the links between how children and adolescents behave, think, and react to their worlds and how their brains are organised. Her studies aim to better understand psychiatric conditions such as depression and Autism and to improve treatments by tracing the origins of these conditions in the developing brain. Clare’s Google Scholar Author Profile is available here: http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=1_bjrikAAAAJ&hl=en   Abstract: Task-independent or “resting state” functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) approaches (“functional connectomics”) have revolutionized our understanding of brain functional organisation and have driven significant advances toward the goal of identifying valid and reliable biomarkers of psychiatric illness. Yet, despite the rapid growth of the field, together with...

Seminar Christoph T. Weidemann

Tweet SEMINAR UNF SERIES Speaker:  Christoph T. Weidemann, Ph. D. Title: The dynamics of memory – Decoding brain activity with machine learning Where: CRIUGM Room E1910 (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) When: Tuesday July 23rd,  13h30-14h30 *The seminar will be presented in English Dr. Weidemann is an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Swansea University in Wales (UK) and currently also a visiting scholar at the University of Pennsylvania. In 2006 he obtained a PhD in Psychology and Cognitive Science (with a minor in Neuroscience) from Indiana University where he worked with Richard Shiffrin. He then joined Mike Kahana’s lab at the University of Pennsylvania as a post-doc and took up a faculty position at Swansea University in 2010. His website is at http://cogsci.info     Abstract: Even though encoding and retrieval processes are both critical determinants of performance in memory tests, only their joint effects are observable in overt behavior. This has led to contentious debates about the nature of the signal elicited by recognition memory probes and about the relative contributions of encoding and retrieval processes in interactions between semantic and episodic memory systems. Using machine learning techniques to quantify relevant signals in brain activity as they unfold during engagement in memory tasks I will address these controversies. Specifically, I will present evidence for a single-route account of recognition memory that is compatible with contributions from familiarity and recollection signals, but relies on a unitary evidence signal that integrates all available evidence. I will also particularly implicate retrieval (rather than encoding) processes in the categorical organization of episodic...

Seminar Muhammad Saleh

Tweet SEMINAR UNF SERIES Speaker:  Muhammad Saleh, Ph. D. Title: Universal MRS Sequences for single- and multi-metabolite editing. Where: CRIUGM Room M6804 (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) When: Friday May 17th,  13h30-14h30 *The seminar will be presented in English Muhammad Saleh is a postdoctoral fellow in the Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Originally from the beautiful island of Zanzibar, Tanzania. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Cape Town, South Africa, involving prospective motion and magnetic field correction during GABA editing followed by in vivo applications. As a fellow at Hopkins, he develops novel methods for measuring brain metabolites, including inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and marker of oxidative stress glutathione (GSH), under the mentorship of Professor Edden. Recently, he standardized these methods across all four major vendors, Philips, Siemens, GE, and Canon, and disseminated to more than 15 site nationally and internationally to study the pathophysiology of a broad range of neurological diseases. He continues to provide support and collaborates with the researchers from different sites, ranging from acquisition to post-processing and quantification of data using Gannet analysis package.   Abstract: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive methodology that allows the quantification of endogenous metabolites in the human body, including the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and redox compound glutathione (GSH) in the brain. However, due to their low concentration, measurement of GABA and GSH using conventional single-voxel MRS is difficult, and at 3T, spectral editing (MEGA-PRESS) is typically used. In this seminar, he will describe how GABA and GSH can be measured in the brain using spectral editing, including some of the limitations...

Seminar Petra Ritter

Tweet SEMINAR UNF SERIES   Speaker:  Prof. Dr. Petra Ritter Title: The Virtual Brain – Improving life through simulation Where: CRIUGM Room E1910 (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) When: Wedenesday May 8th,  16h-17h *The seminar will be presented in English Prof Ritter is a computational neuroscientist and medical doctor at Charité in Berlin. One of her central research topics is the development of brain simulations for individual people with neurological conditions, combining EEG and neuroimaging data. Prof Ritter studied medicine at Humboldt University Berlin. She did residencies at UCLA, UCSD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, and Harvard Medical School, as well as Charité. She completed her doctoral thesis in 2004 at Charité under Arno Villringer. She is a cofounder of The Virtual Brain open-source brain simulation platform. Since October 2017 she has held a lifetime BIH Johanna-Quandt Full Professorship of Brain Simulation at the Dept. of Neurology at the Charité and Berlin Institute of Health.   Links: Petra Ritter @ Berlin Institute for Health (BIH) https://www.bihealth.org/en/research/research-groups/bih-johanna-quandt-professorships/petra-ritter/   Brain Simulation https://brainsimulation.charite.de/en/   Petra Ritter’s publications...

Seminar Mehraveh Salehi

Tweet SEMINAR UNF SERIES     Speaker:  Mehraveh Salehi, Ph. D. Candidate Title: Individualized and state-specific human brain parcellation in multiple scales Where: CRIUGM Room M6804 (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) When: Thursday November 29th,  13h-14h *The seminar will be presented in English Mehraveh Salehi is a Ph.D. candidate in Electrical Engineering department at Yale University. She is currently working as a research intern at Google DeepMind in Montreal. She earned her Bachelor degree in Electrical Engineering from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran. Her research lies at the intersection of statistical machine learning and computational neuroscience. She is interested in developing models that relate human behavior to individual brain connectivity patterns using optimization and machine learning techniques. She has received a number of awards including the Young Scientist Award from the International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention 2017 (MICCAI), and the best poster award from the BioImaging Sciences Retreat 2018. She is also the recipient of Tananbaum Fellowship, Advanced Graduate Leadership Program (AGLP) Fellowship, and CRA-Women Graduate Fellowship.   Abstract: The goal of human brain mapping has long been to delineate functionally coherent regions in the brain and elucidate the functional role of these regions. Previous work has shown great success on defining functionally coherent regions at multiple scales, by grouping voxels into nodes and further grouping those nodes to form communities or networks in the brain. While majority of previous work has assumed fixed functional units across individuals and states, we show that the parcellation of human brain is both individual and state dependent. In this talk, I will first present a recently developed individualized and state-specific parcellation...

Seminar – Désirée Lussier

Tweet SEMINAR UNF SERIES     Speaker:  Désirée Lussier, Ph. D. Candidate Title: Brain structure in Pain and Aging Where: CRIUGM Room E1910 (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) When: Thursday October 25th,  13h-14h *The seminar will be presented in English Désirée Lussier is a postdoctoral candidate at the University of Florida dual specializing in Developmental Psychology and Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience with an anticipated graduation date of May, 2019. Her research interests lie in structural volumetric and connectivity between brain regions in aging, and associated clinical outcomes, using magnetic resonance (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Her master’s thesis, completed at the University of Florida in the Department of Psychology, investigated age-differential effects of intranasal oxytocin resting-state functional connectivity in women. She is currently investigating how interindividual variation in brain morphology and the oxytocin system is impacted by and contribute to the experience of pain, pain perception, and cognition in older adults. Abstract: This talk will focus on changes in brain structure as a result of aging and chronic pain and the associations with the endogenous oxytocin system. Based on these associations, the potential for intranasal oxytocin as a treatment for chronic pain in older adults will be evaluated and discussed. The contribution of interindividual variation in brain structure on clinical outcome will be...

Seminar – Benjamin de Leener

Tweet SEMINAR UNF SERIES Speaker: Benjamin De Leener, Ph.D. Title: The MRI anatomy of the spinal cord, Part I  Where: CRIUGM Room E1910 (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) When: Thursday June 7th,  13h-14h *The seminar will be presented in English Benjamin De Leener (PhD) is a HBHL Postdoctoral Fellow at Doyon Lab). He has a strong passion for medical imaging technologies and computer vision in general. Being able to understand and utilize the content of an image has the potential to revolutionize the way we interact with the world. His main contribution is the development of the Spinal Cord Toolbox (SCT), a comprehensive and open-source software for analyzing MRI images of the spinal cord. SCT includes tools for automatically detecting and segmenting spinal cord structures and extracting multi-parametric MRI data from white matter pathways and gray matter sub regions. His research interests are the development of new analysis and processing methods for medical data, with a particular interest in MRI and neurosciences. Abstract: Over the last decade, the neuroimaging community has developed various tools for processing and analyzing MRI data of the spinal cord. Particularly, recent advances in MRI templates of the spinal cord allows unbiased multicentric studies of large groups of patients, by providing a common referential space. However, the coordinate systems used to build these templates and atlases are based on anatomical structure (a.k.a. the vertebral bodies) and do not appropriately represent the functions of the spinal cord, therefore leading to potential errors when analyzing functional MRI data or the spinal cord internal structure (gray/white matter). This study presents a novel approach for approximating the position of the spinal roots along...

Seminar – Anisha Keshavan

Tweet SEMINAR UNF SERIES Speaker: Dr Anisha Keshavan Title: Leveraging Web Technology to address challenges with Big Data in Neuroscience.  Where: CRIUGM Room E1910 (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) When: Thursday May 31st,  13h-14h *The seminar will be presented in English Dr Anisha Keshavan works with Jason Yeatman in Speech and Hearing Sciences and Ariel Rokem at the eScience Institute. Her research focuses on big data methods in neuroimaging. Advances in MRI technology and image segmentation algorithms have enabled researchers to begin to understand the mechanisms of healthy brain development, psychiatric and neurological disorders. However, accurately measuring the brain at a scale large enough to accommodate genetic association and precision medicine studies is challenging; expert neuroanatomist tracings can take a long time, while automated algorithms are not accurate enough. Dr Keshavan aims to develop methods to combine the accuracy of an experts with the speed of computers by incorporating crowdsourced image segmentation with deep learning algorithms. She received a doctoral degree in Bioengineering from the UC Berkeley – UCSF Joint Graduate Program, and a Bachelor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mathematics from the University of California, Los Angeles. Abstract: Advances in technology have enabled neuroscientists to collect massive amounts of data to answer important scientific questions. But the drawback is that we are experiencing a “data deluge”, which has brought about new challenges that we must overcome in order to truly reap the benefits that Big Data promises. In this talk, I propose that web technology can help us overcome big data challenges, and present examples of how this is done in the field of neuroimaging. First, how web-based data visualization can...