Séminaire Pierre Rainville

SÉMINAIRES DE L’UNF   Présentateur:  Pierre Rainville, Ph. D. Titre: Le compas dans l’œil : l’expression faciale de la douleur à travers la lentille de l’IRM Endroit: Lien pour le séminaire Zoom et PDF de la présentation disponible, le jour même, au http://criugm.qc.ca/zoom/ Date: Jeudi 24 avril 2020,  13h30-14h30 *La conférence sera présentée en français, les diapositives en seront en anglais Pierre Rainville est professeur titulaire au département de stomatologie de l’Université de Montréal chercheur et Directeur du laboratoire de recherche en neuro-psychologie de la douleur LaNeP3 au Centre de recherche de l’IUGM. Résumé: L’étude de la douleur offre une fenêtre privilégiée sur la communication et l’empathie. L’encodage de la douleur par l’expression faciale reflète ses dimensions sensorielles et affectives et fournit une information complémentaire au rapport verbal sur la réponse nociceptive du cerveau. Cette réponse est largement dépendante de régions préfrontales qui régulent l’expression selon des facteurs personnels et contextuels. Le décodage par l’observateur active en partie les mêmes réseaux cérébraux associés à la douleur mais selon des patrons locaux distinctifs. De plus, l’attention portée à la signification de l’expression de douleur observée sollicite des régions pré-motrices et préfrontales associées à l’imitation et à l’interprétation de l’état ou de l’intention d’autrui (cf. théorie de l’esprit). Des études psychophysiologiques sur la phase transactionnelle démontrent également que le décodage d’expressions de douleur amplifie la réactivité réflexe de l’observateur à des stimuli nociceptifs et augmente sa propre sensibilité douloureuse. Ces effets sont partiellement congruents avec le principe de simulation vicariante inhérent à la contagion émotionnelle et démontrent le rôle fondamental des mécanismes de régulation de l’encodage et du décodage liés à l’intention de...

Séminaire Arman Eshaghi

SÉMINAIRES DE L’UNF Présentateur:  Arman Eshaghi, MD., Ph. D. Titre: Subtyping and Staging Multiple Sclerosis for Precision Clinical Trials Endroit: CRIUGM Room E1910 (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) Date: Vendredi 13 décembre,  11h00-12h00 *La conférence sera présentée en anglais Dr Eshaghi is currently a research associate at the Department of Neuroinflammation at University College London (UCL). His main research interests are the application of model-based machine learning, Bayesian, and causal inference methods to understand the underlying mechanism of progressive multiple sclerosis. He is currently working as part of the international network of Progressive MS Alliance led by Prof Douglas Arnold (Montreal Neurological Institute, Montreal, Canada), Prof Olga Ciccarelli, and Dr Declan Chard (UCL, UK).  He is a member of the Progression of Neurodegenerative Disorders (POND) Team at the Centre for Medical Image Computing at the Department of Computer Science at UCL, working closely with Prof Danny Alexander. He obtained his medical doctorate degree (M.D) in 2013 from Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Iran and has been awarded a PhD in Neuroscience from University College London in the UK in 2018. He was awarded the Young Investigator of Year in 2016 by the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS). He has been awarded the Jacqueline du Pré Grant in 2011, ECTRIMS-MAGNIMS Fellowship in 2015, and the Multiple Sclerosis International Federation’s Ian McDonald Fellowship in 2016.   Abstract: There are 4 courses of multiple sclerosis (MS): clinically-isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting MS, primary-progressive MS and secondary-progressive MS. We aimed to achieve a further sophistication in the definition of MS phenotypes by identifying patient subgroups who accumulate MRI abnormalities with similar patterns. In a retrospective study, we...

Séminaire Joana Pereira

SÉMINAIRES DE L’UNF Présentateur: Joana Pereira,  Ph.D. Titre: Alterations of the brain connectome as an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease Endroit: CRIUGM – Local E1910 (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) Date: Mercredi 21 août 2019, 11h00-12h00 *La conférence sera présentée en anglais Dr. Pereira is an associate professor at the Division of Clinical Geriatrics. She has a PhD in Biomedicine by the University of Barcelona. Dr Pereira is working with structural MRI, functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Her current projects are focused on the assessment of brain connectivity and network topology in preclinical and clinical stages of these disorders.   Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurological disorder with a long preclinical phase that typically extends over two decades. As AD progresses, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles spread in the brain according to a characteristic spatial pattern. Since this spread along connected brain regions is associated with the development of cognitive decline and dementia, alterations of brain connectivity can identify individuals with early AD and predict their progression. The entire network of connections between brain regions is known as the brain connectome. In this talk, I will present evidence that changes in the brain connectome can be used to identify individuals at high risk of developing AD and I will also compare them with connectome changes in another prevalent neurodegenerative disorder – Parkinson’s...

Séminaire Clare Kelly

SÉMINAIRES DE L’UNF Présentateur: Clare Kelly,  Ph.D. Titre: Progress and promise of fMRI functional connectomics for neuropsychiatric disorders Endroit: CRIUGM – Amphithéâtre Le Groupe Maurice (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) Date: Mercredi 14 août 2019, 13h00-14h00 *La conférence sera présentée en anglais Dr. Clare Kelly graduated from Trinity with her BA in 2002 and PhD in 2006 (Psychology). She spent the next nine years at New York University School of Medicine, where she made key contributions to the field of functional connectomics, a network-based technique that examines patterns of synchronised brain activity to provide a comprehensive, non-invasive map of brain circuitry. Her work includes seminal demonstrations of the clinical, developmental, and translational utility of functional connectomics for our understanding of healthy and disordered brain function. In January 2015, Clare returned to Trinity College to become an Ussher Assistant Professor of Functional Neuroimaging, working at Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience (TCIN), the School of Psychology, and Department of Psychiatry at the School of Medicine. At TCD, Clare uses translational brain imaging techniques to examine the links between how children and adolescents behave, think, and react to their worlds and how their brains are organised. Her studies aim to better understand psychiatric conditions such as depression and Autism and to improve treatments by tracing the origins of these conditions in the developing brain. Clare’s Google Scholar Author Profile is available here: http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=1_bjrikAAAAJ&hl=en   Abstract: Task-independent or “resting state” functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) approaches (“functional connectomics”) have revolutionized our understanding of brain functional organisation and have driven significant advances toward the goal of identifying valid and reliable biomarkers of psychiatric illness. Yet, despite the rapid growth of the field, together with increasingly...

Séminaire Christoph T. Weidemann

SÉMINAIRES DE L’UNF Présentateur: Christoph T. Weidemann,  Ph.D. Titre: The dynamics of memory – Decoding brain activity with machine learning Endroit: CRIUGM – Local E1910 (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) Date: Mardi 23 juillet 2019, 13h30-14h30 *La conférence sera présentée en anglais Dr. Weidemann is an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Swansea University in Wales (UK) and currently also a visiting scholar at the University of Pennsylvania. In 2006 he obtained a PhD in Psychology and Cognitive Science (with a minor in Neuroscience) from Indiana University where he worked with Richard Shiffrin. He then joined Mike Kahana’s lab at the University of Pennsylvania as a post-doc and took up a faculty position at Swansea University in 2010. His website is at http://cogsci.info   Abstract: Even though encoding and retrieval processes are both critical determinants of performance in memory tests, only their joint effects are observable in overt behavior. This has led to contentious debates about the nature of the signal elicited by recognition memory probes and about the relative contributions of encoding and retrieval processes in interactions between semantic and episodic memory systems. Using machine learning techniques to quantify relevant signals in brain activity as they unfold during engagement in memory tasks I will address these controversies. Specifically, I will present evidence for a single-route account of recognition memory that is compatible with contributions from familiarity and recollection signals, but relies on a unitary evidence signal that integrates all available evidence. I will also particularly implicate retrieval (rather than encoding) processes in the categorical organization of episodic...

Séminaire Muhammad Saleh

SÉMINAIRES DE L’UNF Présentateur: Muhammad Saleh,  Ph.D. Titre: Universal MRS sequences for single- and multi-metabolite editing. Endroit: CRIUGM – Local M6804 (http://www.criugm.qc.ca/en/contact.html) Date: Vendredi 17 mai 2019, 13h30-14h30 *La conférence sera présentée en anglais Muhammad Saleh is a postdoctoral fellow in the Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Originally from the beautiful island of Zanzibar, Tanzania. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Cape Town, South Africa, involving prospective motion and magnetic field correction during GABA editing followed by in vivo applications. As a fellow at Hopkins, he develops novel methods for measuring brain metabolites, including inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and marker of oxidative stress glutathione (GSH), under the mentorship of Professor Edden. Recently, he standardized these methods across all four major vendors, Philips, Siemens, GE, and Canon, and disseminated to more than 15 site nationally and internationally to study the pathophysiology of a broad range of neurological diseases. He continues to provide support and collaborates with the researchers from different sites, ranging from acquisition to post-processing and quantification of data using Gannet analysis package.   Abstract: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive methodology that allows the quantification of endogenous metabolites in the human body, including the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and redox compound glutathione (GSH) in the brain. However, due to their low concentration, measurement of GABA and GSH using conventional single-voxel MRS is difficult, and at 3T, spectral editing (MEGA-PRESS) is typically used. In this seminar, he will describe how GABA and GSH can be measured in the brain using spectral editing, including some of the limitations of the...